Is it spring yet?

The crocuses are starting to come out early this year.

Fun in the snow

A month after the first snowfall, we got more.

As always Lola goes bonkers as she simply loves being out in the snow.

Buchanan Castle ruins

A wander around Buchanan Castle on a cold, crisp Sunday afternoon.

Balquhidder’s Old Kirk

Exploring Blaquhidder’s Old Kirk and graveyard.

It’s not just Rob Roy’s grave that’s interesting.

Snow storms and a winter sunsets

Just after starting our walk along the shores of Loch Lomond from Milarrochy Bay, we could see an ominous snow cloud coming our way across the loch. Less than ten minutes into our walk we decided not to take a gamble and swiftly head back for the car. It was a good choice to have our tea/coffee with shortbread from the comfort of our warm car while the snow and wind whirled around.

About forty minutes later, the snow had cleared and we were back out for our walk and to enjoy the never tiring views.

I couldn’t resit taking yet another picture of the famous oak tree against the backdrop of the passing storm clouds and the slowly re-emerging winter sun.

At the end of our refreshing walk we even got to see yet another memorable sunset at Milarrochy Bay.

High Kirk of Campsie

A wander round the High Kirk of Campsie and graveyard in Lennoxtown.

Sunrise after our first snow

A magnificent sunrise after we got our first real snowfall of the year.

St. Machan’s kirkyard

Another wander through St Machan’s graveyard.

Sunset from Drumbeck

Magnificant views to Glasgow, Slackdhu and Strathblane on the way down from a late afternoon walk up Dumbreck on New Year’s Day.

Snow on the mountains

We went out for a drive to Loch Lomond and a walk along the shore from Milarrochy Bay.

Scots pines at Loch Katrine

For a change, we decided to take a scenic drive through the Trossachs and up to Loch Katrine for a an afternoon wander along the loch shores.

Loch Katrine turned out to be extremely quiet, with only a handful of cars from walkers parked in the massive car park. Unlike to usual hustle and bustle with busloads of tourists, the firmly shut tourist shops, cafe’s and boats looking more like a recently abandoned ghost town than a tourist hot spot.

We wandered out and back along the slightly uninspiring tarmac road along the North shore of the loch on what turned out to be a very bleak day. The Scots pines on the South shore and the winter colours of steep slopes of Ben Venue providing some interest.

The SS Sir Walter Scott

The SS Sir Walter Scott is a small steamship that was built in 1899 at Dumbarton that has provided pleasure cruises and ferry services on Loch Katrine for well over a century. The steamer is the only surviving screw steamer in regular passenger service in Scotland and is named after the writer Sir Walter Scott, who set his 1810 poem Lady of the Lake, and his 1818 novel Rob Roy around Loch Katrine.

I wholeheartedly agree with David Ritchie, who took the below photograph of the SS Sir Walter Scott back in 2006, that recent restorations have unfortunately ruined the steamer’s looks.

The SS Sir Walter Scott in 2006, courtesy of David Ritchie